5 Outdoor Learning Activities for Your Child

This is a collaborative post 

As a parent it’s important to try and enrich your child’s learning journey by exploring different activities both in and outside your home. Outdoor learning is an important element of a child’s education and many schools try to incorporate into the curriculum, particularly for early years students who are better at absorbing information via their senses. If you would like to try some outdoor learning activities of your own, here are some ideas from a pre-prep school in Hampshire.

Build a Bird Feeder

Invite some birds to your garden by creating a DIY birdfeeder with your child. This will help them learn some of the many different species of birds and also what they like to eat. There are many tips online on how to create your very own birdfeeder.

Grow Your Own

If you’re lucky enough to have a reasonably large garden, you could consider starting a fruit or vegetable patch with your child. This will teach them some important life skills, such as the importance of taking care of something and being patient whilst it grows. They will also start to understand what a plant requires in order to survive, including plenty of sunlight and water.

Read a Map

Map reading skills are not as essential as they once were now that we have satellite navigation on our phones. However, knowing how to read coordinates and symbols on a map will help your child with their maths and geography skills. Next time you go out for a walk, give your child a map and ask them to find their way to your desired destination.

Collect Some Leaves

During autumn, one excellent outdoor activity is collecting the fallen leaves.  Your child could use them to create a work of art, or simply explore the different types of trees that the leaves belong to.

Go For a Walk

Outdoor learning doesn’t have to be complicated. Something as simple as taking a stroll through a local forest will present many learning opportunities for your child. For instance, you can keep an eye out for different animals and bugs or discuss how seasonality affects nature.

As you can see, there are a lot of options when it comes to outdoor learning activities; the above ideas merely scratch the surface. The time of year will, of course, have an impact on which activity you choose, but as long as you remember that learning isn’t limited to a classroom environment, you are on the right track.

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