How To Be More Involved in Your Child’s Education

This is a collaborative post

Whether you loved or loathed your school years, one thing remains constant – that it provides you with the largest set of skills to take you through life. So, when your child is starting or going through their education, they’re going to have a lot of the same thoughts.

It’s important to retain a bond with your child as they’re going through the most important years of their life, and being involved with your child’s education will strengthen that bond, boosting confidence and a myriad of other benefits.

I’ve teamed up with a senior girls school in London to show how you can become invested in your child’s journey and how you can support them along the way.

Take part in school activities

There’s often a school sports day or arts and crafts event where you can help your child win some races or build something spectacular for their teachers to see. There are sometimes outdoor activities away from school grounds that parents can take part in as well.

These kinds of games or challenges can make your child feel warm and welcoming to be around as well as cheering you on from the sidelines!

Ask your child about their day

Your child does spend the vast majority of their time in school when they’re younger, so why not ask them about how their day went? Spark up a conversation over dinner about what subjects they enjoyed and what felt like a struggle on that day. 

You may find that discussions like these will help your child be more honest and open in front of you. And if they are struggling in particular areas you’ll be able to lend them a hand wherever you’re able.

Go through your child’s homework with them

Like all of us we struggle from time to time with our homework, so when they’re at a younger age it’s wise to sit next to them and follow as they do their work. Try not to interfere directly each time, but remind them that you are closeby should they need your help.

Encourage them to use a lot of the skills they’ve learnt from the classroom, like their critical thinking and problem-solving skills, before turning to you for help. And when you are called to help make sure you explain how the problem for each question can be solved by breaking it down into chunks for them. That way, should a similar question come up in an exam or a test, they’ll be able to remember what you taught them.

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