Top Tips for Practising Gratitude with Your Child

This is a collaborative post 

Encouraging your child to be grateful goes beyond prompting them to say, “thank you”. It’s all about helping them look for the positive aspects of their life, including the things they appreciate, to promote a stronger sense of satisfaction and optimism. This doesn’t just have to be in reference to material items, but also to relationships and experiences. I have teamed up with private school in Herts to share some tips on how you can practise gratitude with your child at home. 

Be a Good Role Model

Of course, children learn from their parents, so the most important thing you can do to help your child become more grateful is to be a good role model and try to be grateful yourself. Avoid complaining about things that may be stressful to you, like your job or your household bills, and instead try and share some of your positive experiences and emotions. You should even try and put a positive spin on seemingly negative experiences. For instance, you could say “It’s a shame we couldn’t go to the park because of the rain but I feel really lucky that I got to spend a lovely day playing board games and watching movies with you instead” or “I know we’re running late to the cinema, but at least we’ll miss the adverts and queues”. Encourage your child to look on the bright side with these types of statements. 

Practise Gratitude

Perhaps you could make it a tradition for each member of your family to share one thing you’re all grateful for each evening at dinner or in the car on the way home from school. They could be simple things like someone making you a cup of tea or giving you a lift. The idea behind this is to get your child to think about their day on a deeper level and look for positives in even the smallest of things to help them become a happier, more confident individual. You could even take this one step further and encourage your child to fill out a gratitude journal each night before bed.

Demonstrate Appreciation

You should also ensure that you child demonstrates their appreciation to others. For example, they could send thank you cards to everyone who attended their birthday party or to their teachers at the end of term for helping them progress academically. The trick is to help your child learn to appreciate other people and the effort they go to, not just material things like gifts. 

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