Reasons to buy real wooden flooring…and things to consider!

This is a collaborative post 

With there being so many for flooring options in the modern age, it’s actually made it harder for customers to make the right decision on what to pick. Whether you’re from a busy family household and practicality is number one priority, or impressing guests with the beauty of real wooden flooring is important to you, choosing the perfect product isn’t always easy. Hopefully we can provide you with a number of reasons as to why wooden flooring is the perfect addition to your home, while also keeping in mind some of its restrictions. The following information should help ease your decision and lay it out more simply for you… 

Nearly everyone would agree that real wood flooring is exquisite, presenting the wood’s natural beauty. Its timeless, charming magnificence never goes out of fashion and allows it to suit both a modern and contemporary

interior. With colours ranging from deep, dark walnuts, through to golden honey oaks and even further on to pale bamboo, wood flooring is also available in a rage of finishes and styles.

Of course, solid wood flooring is considerably more expensive than other options available, but you can’t deny that the splendour of wooden flooring makes the higher cost justifiable. 

We are all for solid wood, but we won’t deny it comes with its restrictions. One of the first things to consider is whether you’re wanting to install underfloor heating. Solid wood is best avoided, as its not able to cooperate with fluctuating temperatures.

Durability is something we all look for in a floor- if you’re going to spend a significant amount on new flooring, then you’ll want to know that it’s going to last. Solid wood flooring is extremely hard-wearing, withstanding high foot traffic areas, making it a suitable option for hallways, living and bedrooms. As well as this, if scratches and stains do occur, or it does start to show wear, then it can be sanded down to make it as good as new! The number of times it can be sanded down depends on thickness, for example a flooring that has a thickness of 5mm would be able to be sanded down up to four times. However, this shouldn’t need to be done for the first 15-20 years, so you can only imagine how impressive it’s going to look for a long time. 

Although solid wood flooring is immensely durable, scratches and stains can occur. Stones from shoes, kid’s toys and pet’s sharp claws can occasionally cause damage. That’s why we’d recommend keeping your pets claws trimmed to help reduce this!  A flooring with a brushed finish can sometimes help disguise scratches, so maybe consider this as an option if you do have little creatures in your home. Doormats by entrances will also make a difference in stopping stones and other outdoor paraphernalia entering your home and causing damage to your floor. Avoid stains by cleaning up any spillages as soon as possible and don’t place solid wood flooring in areas where water exposure is more common. 

Solid wood flooring can often increase the value of your property too. People view it as luxurious and affluent, certainly something buyers will be more attracted to than other flooring choices.

Of course, like anything, solid wood flooring does require attention and care to keep it looking in mint condition, you just need to be mindful of how best to protect your real wooden flooring, then it can be a fantastic worry-free option. 

A quick sweep daily and a mop a couple of times a week will suffice, however do not use a steam mop on your wooden floor. We’d recommend purchasing cleaning and maintenance products which are specific to your chosen flooring type to ensure no damage is done and keep it look as good as the day you bought it!

 

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